Human Resources

The National Law Journal’s Go-To Law Schools

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The National Law Journal

This year’s edition of sibling publication The National Law Journal’s annual special report focuses on what, for many law students, is the bottom line: ­whether they stand any chance at all of landing a coveted ­associateship at a major law firm. On that count, the NLJ found the picture marginally brighter for the most recent law school grads—but that’s not saying much.

The report also examines trends in the hiring market, including a decline in large-firm participation in on-campus interviews. The move away from such interviews isn’t so much about firms no longer believing in the cattle show—although one firm, Quinn Emanuel Urquhart & Sullivan, has come up with an alternative that it prefers—as much as a reflection of the fact there there are simply fewer entry-level jobs to fill. Some elite law graduates, meanwhile, are finding a new appreciation for the charms of midsize firms.

Click here for the complete NLJ report, including charts and features.

via The National Law Journal’s Go-To Law Schools.

» Ruling puts curbs on lawyers, law firms

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By Winthrop Quigley

Supreme Court Justice Richard C. Bosson wrote the unanimous opinion that could result in limiting the lateral movement of attorneys between law firms. (journal file)

A recent New Mexico Supreme Court ruling could limit a lawyer’s ability to move from one firm to another, the court acknowledged in a unanimous opinion written by Justice Richard C. Bosson.

The court held that not only can an individual lawyer be prevented from participating in a case if he or she was once an attorney for the opposing side in that case, but the lawyer’s firm can be ordered to withdraw from the case as well.

via » Ruling puts curbs on lawyers, law firms | ABQ Journal.

Micromanaging: The Secret to Getting Employees to Love You More – Forbes

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FORBESWOMAN | 2/21/2013 @ 11:54AM

By Melissa Llarena

In 2012, 75% of my clients said they called me for career coaching when they could no longer take micromanagement. Some felt like children, others like puppets. All said succumbing to a boss who is constantly checking in became a major time guzzler. Not one client said micromanagement made them want to stay and work harder. Micromanaging means paying too much attention to details. It usually has a negative connotation, yet these coaching clients agree there are certain details that should not be ignored.

via Micromanaging: The Secret to Getting Employees to Love You More – Forbes.

Midsize firms see culture as a recruiting tool – ABA Journal

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Midsize firms see culture as a recruiting tool

Posted Feb 21, 2013 9:18 AM CST

By Debra Cassens Weiss

Midsize law firms believe culture helps them in the hiring process.

Seventy percent of midsize law firms said a strong culture is among the top two factors in recruiting new lawyers, according to a survey by the law firm referral network TAGLaw and the Center for the Study of the Legal Profession at Georgetown University Law Center. The second factor was overall quality of the firm. The groups issued a press release and the National Law Journal covered the findings.

via Midsize firms see culture as a recruiting tool – ABA Journal.

Are lawyers more miserable than general population? – ABA Journal

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Are lawyers more miserable than general population?

Posted Feb 20, 2013 7:09 AM CST

By Debra Cassens Weiss

The conventional wisdom is that lawyers are a cynical, miserable lot.

Now a positive psychology guru who teaches at Duke Law School is seeking to dispel that notion. Writing as a guest blogger for the Careerist, Dan Bowling says lawyers aren’t so miserable after all.

Lawyers are generally satisfied with their lives, reporting rates of well-being that are about the same as the general population, Bowling says. On a bell curve, most lawyers report life satisfaction around the middle. Students entering law school are even happier, reporting well-being that is above average. Does the law school experience change their outlook? Bowling will be studying 3Ls to find the answer.

via Are lawyers more miserable than general population? – ABA Journal.

Future Law School Applicants Are Wealthier, More Self-Confident Than Average College Student

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Future Law School Applicants Are Wealthier, More Self-Confident Than Average College Student

By Karen Sloan All Articles The National Law JournalFebruary 8, 2013

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No, it’s not your imagination. Aspiring lawyers tend to be more self-confident, enjoy more family wealth and are more likely to have a lawyer parent than the average college student, according to research released by the Law School Admission Council.

The study, Behind the Data: Comparing Law School Applicants To All College Freshman, weighed the socioeconomic, demographic and other characteristics of law school applicants.

via Future Law School Applicants Are Wealthier, More Self-Confident Than Average College Student.

Cornell Law Launches Course on Whistleblower Law

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Cornell Law Launches Course on Whistleblower Law

By Tania Karas All Articles New York Law JournalFebruary 19, 2013

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Students at Cornell Law School interested in the federal False Claims Act can now take a course dedicated to the rapidly expanding area of citizen-initiated whistleblower actions.

The elective, Whistleblower Law: Involving Private Citizens in Public Law Enforcement, focuses on qui tam provisions of the federal and state False Claims Acts, as well as SEC, IRS and other whistleblower laws. Students will also learn about legal provisions protecting employee whistleblowers from retaliation.

via Cornell Law Launches Course on Whistleblower Law.